The Chronicles of the Hydraulic Brotherhood
Lloyd G. Carter, former UPI and Fresno Bee reporter, has been writing about California water issues for more than 35 years. He is President of the California Save Our Streams Council. He is also a board member of the Underground Gardens Conservancy and host of a monthly radio show on KFCF, 88.1 FM in Fresno. This is his personal blog site and contains archives of his news career as well as current articles, radio commentaries, and random thoughts.

State Water Board releases draft of San Joaquin River salinity standards

The State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) staff today (Sept. 15) released a draft proposal to update water quality requirements for salinity in the southern Delta and water flows in major tributaries to the San Joaquin River (the Stanislaus, Tuolumne, and Merced Rivers), which drain into the southern Delta.

The refined salinity requirements reflect updated scientific information about salt levels that reasonably protect farming in the southern Delta. The new flow requirements for the San Joaquin River’s major tributaries recognize the vital role upstream water flows provide for habitat and migratory signals for native fish species. In summary, the draft proposes increasing flows for fish and wildlife and adjusts the salinity requirements to a slightly higher level to reflect updated scientific knowledge.  READ MORE »

Ocean Selenium Influences Evolution?

'Eureka moment' research into ocean selenium levels asks: Did mountains control evolution of humans?

 

 SEE:  http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-31/utas-core-sample-research-challenging-evolution-mass-extinction/7800878

Ontario's New Energy Plan - Confronting Climate Change

 

Ontario’s New Energy Plan - Confronting Climate Change

By Emma Bailey

 

For too long, action against climate change has taken the form of vague promises and elusive legislation. However, with the recent passing of Ontario’s Climate Change Mitigation and Low Carbon Economy Act and the establishment of a broader 5-year “Climate Change Action Plan”, quantitative measures and tangible progress towards emissions reduction are now in place in the province of Ontario, Canada. With the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) our neighbors to the north aim to drastically reduce greenhouse gas pollution (GHG), create jobs and shift all families and businesses towards a low-carbon economy.

 

By the year 2050 if all goes according to the “plan”, carbon emissions in the province will be 80 percent lower than they were in 1990 – an ambitious target which will require a dramatic restructuring of all infrastructure supporting Ontario’s current society.

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Environmental Justice and Democracy Failures at the Heart of Flint’s Water Crisis

By Jesse Worker and Elizabeth Moses, World Resources Institute

 May 10, 2016  READ MORE »

State Audit requested for proposed Delta Twin Tunnels

From the offices of Assemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman and Senator Lois Wolk:

Susan EggmanWolkAssemblymember Susan Talamantes Eggman and Senator Lois Wolk announced on Monday that they will request a state audit of California Water Fix, the new name for a very old project to divert water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.  READ MORE »

San Francisco Double Standard

 
 
 
  
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Kern County Residents Conduct Capitol Sit-In to Protest Central Valley Oil Drilling

by Dan Bacher
 
Governor Jerry Brown has become infamous for spouting off about “climate change” and “green energy” at international climate conferences as he promotes environmentally destructive policies, including fracking,  pollution trading and R.E.D.D. and the salmon-killing Delta Tunnels, back at home.

 

Three protesters from Kern County are apparently tired of Governor Brown’s green rhetoric and pro-Big Oil actions and are currently conducting a sit-in outside of Governor Jerry Brown’s offices in the State Capitol as part of “Break Free,” a global wave of actions to keep fossil fuels in the ground.  READ MORE »

Westlands Water Deal is all wet

Editor's Note: The San Francicsco Chronicle ran the following editorial on April 30, 2016

  When the public is railing about the unfairness of Big Bank bailouts and corporate welfare, why is the Obama administration pursuing a deal that gives away California water — a resource as precious as oil — to a San Joaquin Valley water agency?

  A proposed legal settlement would wipe off the federal books a long-standing lawsuit but also reward the Westlands Water District with what every community in the arid West would like — a permanent water contract.

  The proposed agreement and the changes in law required to implement it contained in HR4366 give away water that belongs to all Californians and do nothing to ensure the state’s land, wildlife and humans are protected from pollution.  READ MORE »

American Banking Association Report: Farm Banks Increase Ag Lending 8% in 2015

ABA Report: Farm Banks Increase Ag Lending 8% in 2015

WASHINGTON — Farm banks increased agricultural lending by 7.9 percent in 2015 and held $100.3 billion in farm loans at the end of the year, according to the American Bankers Association’s annual Farm Bank Performance Report READ MORE »

Early Days of the Central Valley Project: The Role of Progressive Republicans, Freemasons, and Mormon Irrigators

 
 by
Gary Stadelman Posz


This article grew out of conversation with colleagues about a speech Governor Earl Warren gave to a conference on water resource development at Stanford University in 1945. In his remarks, the Governor called for aggressive development of California's water resources. Little is known about the background of this speech, most particularly about what prompted Warren to launch so directly and forcefully into this fraught pubic policy domain when he had previously not identified himself with it; this was a high profile move outside of his known political interests and priorities.

I joined this conversation with commentary on the mutually reenforcing influences favoring water development in the West, which essentially pervaded the political space of Warren's career. One cannot claim that the influence matrix I describe here was dispositive in explaining Warren's unprecedented policy pronouncement. Bailing-wire sociology cum political science this narrative might be, yet it identifies significant influences present and operating in California politics when Earl Warren emerged in 1945 as a water development advocate.
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